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Introduction

A January 2010 article in the New York Times discussed the use of health insurance as a “perk” for employees, rather than something that supports the health of the person. It was written by contributing writer and physician Dr. Chas Roan, who writes a blog at http://chasroan.com/blog/. He wrote that while many companies are offering company-sponsored health insurance plans that they believe will encourage employees to stay on their plan longer and return more often for consultations, these plans don’t work because people have to pay thousands of dollars out of pocket to cover their procedures and medications, but once they leave their jobs, those insurers no longer cover them. The article said “It’s really a system designed to reward people with private insurance for being healthy,” adding: “Employers want you to be healthy so you can return more often.”

In conclusion: Companies offer healthcare benefits not by virtue of any intrinsic worth but in order to get you into their buildings once or twice per month so they can keep paying your salary or keep your job open if they decide not to renew it on your last day. Employees get stuck paying way too much out of pocket when they need healthcare while employers benefit from what should be considered an indirect subsidy of employee healthcare costs. So not only do you have someone else’s money covering your healthcare expenses but also that same employer is benefiting from this fact by saving money on employing people who are sickly and expensive over time because most workers get sick and become costly during their prime years rather than staying healthy at home where they could work from home too! Sounds like an awful punishment doesn’t it?

You’re a healthy, young adult with a full-time job.

If you’ve got the right kind of health insurance, it’s not necessarily worth paying a premium to get private health insurance. You’ll want to consider two things:

  • Are you healthy? If so, then private health insurance won’t be much more beneficial than your employer’s plan. The cost is negligible compared with the difference in premiums between public and private options (and remember that employers often pay all or most of employee medical costs).
  • Do you need comprehensive coverage? If not, then there’s no reason why getting another policy would be worthwhile—but if so then it could be worth paying some extra out-of-pocket expenses if those add up over time.

Some people think they don’t need health insurance.

If you’re a healthy, young adult with a full-time job and no health issues, there’s no reason to get private health insurance. You can pay the same amount of money for the same coverage as your employer without any of the headaches of dealing with insurance companies.

If you want to quit your job and start a business that requires more than just being able to go into work every day (or if there are serious risks involved), then it might be worth looking into some sort of plan that covers employees who work at certain types of businesses or locations.

Others think they do.

Other people might think they don’t need health insurance, but it’s not always the case.

Some people think that if their employer offers them a plan and pays for it, then it’s okay for them to skip buying private health insurance. But even if your employer does offer you a plan—and pays for it—you should still consider buying private health insurance because:

  • Your employer may not cover all of your costs when you need medical care. This can happen if there’s no co-pay and deductible required by the plan (which means not paying anything out of pocket), or if there is a high deductible (with no coverage until after your annual limit has been reached). If this happens and you don’t have any other way of paying for treatment, then maybe having some type of coverage like Medicaid would be better than nothing at all! Also remember that even though an individual policy might seem cheaper on paper than group coverage costs more overall because there are fewer doctors available per person; however since most people only visit doctor once every few years chances are slim they’ll ever see another one again so long as they stay healthy enough not too worry about getting sick again anytime soon.”

Still others don’t know what’s right for them.

One of the biggest misconceptions about private health insurance is that it’s always better, or even necessary. Many people feel like they need to have a policy just because they’re healthy and don’t want to pay out-of-pocket should they get sick.

But that’s not necessarily true: You can still have excellent quality of life without having coverage for all major medical expenses (which could cost several thousand dollars per year). In fact, if you’re healthy enough and your employer offers affordable benefits—or if you source those yourself through an HSA account—then there’s no reason why you shouldn’t save money by paying cash instead of buying insurance from an insurer that has already been paid off by premiums collected over time via monthly payments.

Whether you need private health insurance depends on your situation.

Whether you need private health insurance depends on your situation.

  • If you have a full-time job and are covered by one of the following government health schemes (known as ‘GPs’), then these cover you for all medical expenses that aren’t paid directly by your employer:
  • Medicare (for people over 65 years old)
  • Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) – PBS covers prescription drugs, diagnostic tests such as X-rays and scans, treatment by physiotherapists and speech pathologists etc. It also covers some dental services. However, it only pays 60% of the cost of those treatments that are not available under Medicare or PBS; if this is more than what your insurer will cover then you’ll need to pay out of pocket until they decide whether or not to reimburse their clients for these expenses at any given time throughout each year. The maximum amount eligible for reimbursement per item varies depending on where each item falls within its category but typically ranges from $200-$500 depending on which type(s) were prescribed during treatment sessions conducted by doctors who specialize in treating specific conditions related specifically towards those suffering from them being represented hereunder mentioned hereafter referred hereinabove stated so long as they meet certain criteria set forth hereinabove stated above said conditions being met before submitting such claims forma

The thinking goes like this: “If I have private health insurance, I can get the same care that my employer offers and save money. I’ll be able to quit my job and start a business.”

The thinking goes like this: “If I have private health insurance, I can get the same care that my employer offers and save money. I’ll be able to quit my job and start a business.”

The first problem with this logic is that it’s not true. Private health insurance isn’t employer-based health insurance and therefore doesn’t offer all of the same benefits as your company provides (such as free gym memberships). In fact, if you’re self-employed or unemployed, private coverage might actually cost more than what your employer provides because there are no taxes on it—and premiums vary depending on where you live!

Doesn’t work that way, however. Many people with private coverage believe they’re getting the same care their employer offers, but in reality their coverage has far too many gaps and holes to fill. They end up paying more than they would to stay on their job’s plan or to buy affordable health insurance on their own, even if they’re already paying a hefty amount of income tax because there are so many deductions.

  • Health insurance isn’t a simple market. There are many health insurance companies, each with its own set of benefits and prices.
  • The health insurance market is not a single product or company—it’s made up of thousands of different products that are sold by multiple companies based on their unique needs and locations.
  • You can’t just go to one place and buy your health care coverage in the same way you’d buy groceries at Walmart or shoes at Foot Locker; there’s no one-stop shopping experience for this kind of thing!

Some employers offer health insurance as an option but it comes at a cost in terms of lower wages and fewer benefits that employees receive once they’ve been working for their company for a while.

Employees can get health insurance through their employer or through the government.

  • Employers offer health insurance as an option but it comes at a cost in terms of lower wages and fewer benefits that employees receive once they’ve been working for their company for a while.
  • Employees can get health insurance through their employer or through the government.

Private health insurance can be good but it depends on your situation

Private health insurance can be a good option if you are healthy and young. If you’re in your 20s, private health insurance will provide an affordable way to pay for routine medical care.

However, if you’re older or have a pre-existing condition (like diabetes or cancer), private health insurance may not be the best option for you. Instead of paying monthly premiums on top of co-pays and deductibles, an HSA could manage those costs more efficiently by reimbursing patients directly through tax-free contributions made by employers and employees alike.

Conclusion

No. I’m not saying that you should only get private health insurance instead of a public plan. I’m just saying that it “depends on your situation.” If you’re healthy, young, and have a full-time job with decent benefits, then it’s probably worth it.

The problem with the argument is the assumption that private health insurance is the same as employer-provided health insurance. The two can’t be compared; they are different things entirely . There are two types of plans: group coverage (employer-based) and individual coverage (self-insured). Group coverage offers many advantages over individual coverage like lower premiums but most importantly, no monthly deductibles or co-payments to worry about. Individual coverage has higher premiums but also has much more protection against cost sharing — i.e., copays and coinsurance — which makes insurance much more affordable in terms of out-of-pocket costs because you won’t have to make 80% of your treatment money from your pocket every single time you go to the doctor . What this means is that high out-of-pocket expenses for certain treatments are spread out over a number of visits instead.

On top of these two very different types of plans, there’s also an important factor called “network,” which is basically who your plan will cover and the specialists they’ll send patients to if necessary—essentially what you have access to when seeking medical treatment within their network (if any). Outstanding insurers such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield tend to limit access in terms of network so they can offer customers better deals than their competitors do (which is why they are known as preferred provider organizations), while companies like Kaiser Permanente don’t typically limit patient access because they believe in providing services at no cost or at a nominal fee so individuals can clearly see what their alternatives are without having to pay separately for procedures performed

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